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Machine Learning functions

These functions can be used when calculating outputs from a trained machine learning model that has been uploaded to the database.

FunctionDescription

ml::name-of-model<version>()

Computes a value from a trained machine learning model

ml::name-of-model<version>()‚Äč

Once a model has been uploaded to the database, the model can be called with inputs resulting in a calculation from the trained ml model. We can do a basic raw computation with the following call:

API DEFINITION
ml::house-price-prediction<0.0.1>(500.0, 1.0);

In the above example, the model we are calling is called house-price-prediction with the version 0.0.1. We then pass in a raw vector of [ [500.0, 1.0] ] Depending on the model, the name and version of the model will vary as well as the inputs. The name and version of the model will be defined in the .surml file which will defined when uploading the model to the database. We can also perform a "buffered compute" with the code below:

API DEFINITION
ml::house-price-prediction<0.0.1>({squarefoot: 500.0, num_floors: 1.0});

Here, we are using the key mappings in the header of the .surml file uploaded to the database to map the fields defined in the object passed into the ml:: function in the correct order. If there are any normalisation parameters in the header of the .surml file, these will also be applied.

The following example shows this function, and its output, when used in a RETURN statement:

RETURN ml::house-price-prediction<0.0.1>({squarefoot: 500.0, num_floors: 1.0});

250000

Seeing as the ML is integrated into our surql, we can infer entire columns using the ml function. We can demonstrate this with a simple example of house prices. We can define some basic table with the following surql:

CREATE house_listing SET squarefoot_col = 500.0, num_floors_col = 1.0;
CREATE house_listing SET squarefoot_col = 1000.0, num_floors_col = 2.0;
CREATE house_listing SET squarefoot_col = 1500.0, num_floors_col = 3.0;

We can then get all the rows with the imputed price prediction with the surql below:

SELECT 
*,
ml::house-price-prediction<0.0.1>({ squarefoot: squarefoot_col, num_floors: num_floors_col }) AS price_prediction
FROM house_listing;

This would statement gives us the following result:

[
{
"id": "house_listing:7bo0f35tl4hpx5bymq5d",
"num_floors_col": 3,
"price_prediction": 406534.75,
"squarefoot_col": 1500
},
{
"id": "house_listing:8k2ttvhp2vh8v7skwyie",
"num_floors_col": 2,
"price_prediction": 291870.5,
"squarefoot_col": 1000
},
{
"id": "house_listing:vnlv3nzr21oi5o23kydw",
"num_floors_col": 1,
"price_prediction": 177206.21875,
"squarefoot_col": 500
}
]

We can see that our price prediction is calculated in the query. We can build on the previous surql to filter based on the computed price prediction with the surql below:

SELECT * FROM (
SELECT
*,
ml::house-price-prediction<0.0.1>({ squarefoot: squarefoot_col, num_floors: num_floors_col }) AS price_prediction
FROM house_listing
)
WHERE price_prediction > 177206.21875;

This gives us the following result:

[
{
"id": "house_listing:7bo0f35tl4hpx5bymq5d",
"num_floors_col": 3,
"price_prediction": 406534.75,
"squarefoot_col": 1500
},
{
"id": "house_listing:8k2ttvhp2vh8v7skwyie",
"num_floors_col": 2,
"price_prediction": 291870.5,
"squarefoot_col": 1000
}
]